Tag Archive: Samadhi


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When reading the ancient yogic texts, many references to khechari mudra can be found. All of which indicate that its practice leads to a state of immortality, in which the yogin no longer fears death, disease or suffering, and enters a state of Samadhi.

Disease, death, and sleep do not trouble him who knows khechari mudra, nor hunger and thirst, nor swoon.

-Yoga Chudamani Upanishad

Immortal liquor is the nectar exuding from the moon (pineal gland). It is produced by the fire, which is generated by inserting the tongue into the nasopharyngeal cavity.

-Hathayoga-Pradipika

Always practicing it (kechari) let him drink the ambrosia daily. By this he obtains Vigraha-siddhi (perfect body), and conquers death even as a lion overpowers an elephant.

-Shiva-Samhita

In my own experience of Kechari mudra I’ve yet to experience the absence of hunger, thirst or disease. However, as with many ancient texts, these words aren’t to be taken literally.

Personal experience

For me, in the first few weeks of experiencing kechari mudra, each time my tongue entered my nasopharyngeal cavity, to touch my nasal septum, it felt like an explosion in my brain. If you’ve ever had snuff, it’s a similar sensation, although, at the same time, very different. The thing is, with snuff, you sneeze once or twice and the explosive feeling passes. With Kechari it doesn’t pass, it intensifies until it reaches a point where your brain feels like it’s bubbling over with ecstatic energy. Over time I got used to this sensation and it became a new state of being.

In those early days of my Kechari experience, when my tongue entered the nasopharyngeal cavity, there was a salty taste (probably from post nasal drip). However, to my surprise, this soon changed. Over the following months, various tastes began to manifest. They went from salty to bitter, then mildly sour,  but eventually stabilised to become sweet. This new intense sweetness was accompanied by the sensation of a very light liquid, almost like liquid air, flowing onto my tongue. This is a sensation comes and goes to this day. And I believe it is what the texts refer to as soma, or the liquor of the gods, although I’m not sure if its effects should be taken literally. Such as invulnerability to poison, and conquering death within 15 days. Yet, again, there is some truth to be found in these claims.

Kechari induced realisation

To understand what the yogic texts mean when they refer to kechari as being a means for gaining immortality and overcoming all disease, we need to look at the effects it has, not on the body, but on the mind.

Referring back to my first experience of Kechari mudra, during my initial awakening, the expanded state of mind initiated by the kechari mudra led me to a sense of being beyond, or before, time. It made me realise, through direct experience, that I am not the body or mind; these things are simply manifestations of my LARGER SELF. In having these realisations, the fear of death completely died. The experience of kechari mudra expands the mind and wakes the yogin up to the realization that he/she in his/her pure state, is immortal and impervious to illness. One who’s mind is absorbed in such a state can never die.

Liquor of the gods

In relation to the sweet nectar like liquid that begins to trickle down the tongue we need to think about the process of meditation. With meditative practices, the idea is to train the mind to become one-pointed and focused to the point where it completely dissolves in its object of focus. At this stage we enter Samadhi.

Because of the intense sweetness, I can say from personal experience that absorbing the mind becomes an easy process when focusing on the taste of the body’s very own ‘nectar of immortality,’ the body’s own fountain of youth.

The martial connection 

In Bushido the aim of the warrior is to become one with his/her opponent, blending with his/her thoughts and actions, dissolving any attack before the thought to attack even arises. Similarly, the aim of Yoga is to unite the body and mind and dissolve into the oneness of everything. One method of achieving this is through the practice of Kechari mudra, which generates a deep feeling of love and connectedness to all beings, with the barriers that seperate the yogin from the rest of the world (identifying him as an individual) dissolving in the advanced stages of the practice, resulting in a sense of oneness with all things.

Interestingly, a variation of Kechari mudra is used in many of the warrior traditions, where the tongue is placed in an alternate position, pressing on the point just behind the teeth, on the hard pallet. In Yoga this is called Nabo mudra, which has a much milder effect than Kechari, but is very beneficial all the same.

Have a look here to read about some other experiences I’ve had with Khechari mudra.

FREE Accidental Yogi’s manual/course will be available to read/print on February 3rd 2014. Here’s the link: FREE MANUAL/COURSE

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While walking by the river in Sligo town with my daughter Aoife, the beautiful swan pictured above came over to say hello.  

Our brief meeting with that swan reminded of a powerful practice called hansa yoga, a practice that is both basic and advanced. Basic in that it’s a simple exercise of following the breath, and advanced in that it’s a powerful mantra capable of arousing the spiritual power called kundalini shakti that lays dormant within us.

The practice is simple. To do it, you sit, stand or lie in a comfortable position. Then, listening to the sound of your breath, as you inhale, visualise a stream of light flowing up through your spine and out into the universe, and as you exhale, visualise a stream of light flowing in from the universe, through your head, and down your spine. During the inhalation phase, sub-vocally make the sound sa, and during the exhalation phase, sub-vocally make the sound han.

This is a very deep subject that probably needs more explanation than I’m about to give it. So, I’ll expand on what I write here in a later post.

Hansa as a mechanism of Samadhi

Hansa is the natural mantra generated by the breath and movement of the prana (energy) through the nadis (energy channels). According to yogic science, It’s this movement of prana through the nadis that causes consciousness to arise. The aim of Yoga is to unite the up-moving prana with the down-moving prana. This unification causes the energy to stop moving, stilling the mind and allowing samadhi (self absorption) to occur.

Han and sa are the sounds of the prana (downward moving energy) and apana (upward moving energy). In using the hansa sadhana (spiritual practice), you are mixing the two of these energies together, which eventually stills the consciousness.

Inner meaning

The meaning of the mantra is “I am that.” I am is the awareness of self, the first point of consciousness arising in duality.

Now, the breath is the sustaining power that binds us to physical existence. As we breathe hansa (I am that), we are binding ourselves to duality. I am that is the cosmic vibration that pulls the SELF into duality, through identification. Keeping this in mind, you can note the following about kundalini shakti. Shakti is the power of the self, the creator of this illusory, phenomenal existance. So you can see that shakti manifests itself through the principle of hansa (I am that).

By consciously using the hansa mantra, you are awakening the sleeping shakti and calling her to the first point of duality within you, which is energetically located at the third eye. This is what’s called raising the kundalini, which leads to the breathless state (nirbikalpa samadhi). 

Whew, how did such a simple post end up getting so full on?!

In my next post, I’ll talk about my own kundalini awakening and somehow explain how yoga relates to Bushido (the way of the warrior).

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